Climate Change

Increasing temperatures, rising sea levels, changing frequencies of rainfall events, extreme weather events, declining sea ice in the Arctic and ascending greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are a few well-known indicators of climate change. A large amount of scientific evidence detailing climate change and its consequences across the world is well documented. The evidence may be local or regional, whereas the consequences are observed on a much bigger scale; thanks to our increasingly interconnected world and our integrated global economy. While there are still questions that hover around whether the climate change that has been observed is primarily anthropogenically driven or because of the climate’s natural variability or a combination of both, significant consensus exists among many including scientists, engineers, farmers, policy-makers and the informed public that we must reduce the man-made contribution to climate change.

Climate change is one of the few subjects that cuts through many research disciplines as well as many sectors of society. The whole process raises more and new questions, which requires a better understanding of the climate change process and its wide horizon and connections among interdisciplinary sciences. Answers to the questions may take different forms as in products, solutions or in increased awareness, which may be developed as a specific skill set. The scientific understanding of climate change is complex, its consequences and issues are of a wide variety, and importantly, they are time and region specific. While identifying key areas/disciplines is difficult, the following have a good fit given its strong association with society and economy, i.e., agriculture, carbon budget, computer sciences, data sciences, energy, environment, infrastructure, mobility, and water resources. Of course, there is much more, and all of it leads to enhanced knowledge, technological innovations, and business opportunities.